Doug Bannister's blog

How to measure digital signage ROI

Digital Signage has experienced a rapid increase in popularity as more and more organizations realize the value this technology can add. In addition to allowing for live audience interactions, compared to what used to be just static paper advertisements, digital signage creates a prime opportunity for brand building while also influencing customer behavior in real-time. It creates a stimulating environment, engaging the customer and impacting short and long term behaviours. However, simply throwing money at digital signage won't deliver the best return on your investment (ROI). Here are some guidelines for measuring your digital signage ROI.   1. Define and Articulate Your Objectives Each organization has unique goals and therefore unique requirements for what they expect to get in terms of return on an investment in new technology, products or processes. First, the organization should define what their definition of “return” entails. Increased sales? Increased efficiency? Time savings? In other words, based on the expectations of the return, what will the signage system be used for? Your objectives for digital signs may vary throughout your organization. For example, some signs may be used for keeping employees informed while others may be used to help customers.   2. Understanding Return on Investment (ROI) and Return on Objectives (ROO) Return on investment is important because of its broad applicability. ROI is, at its simplest, hard dollars returned versus hard dollars invested; the gains from your investment less the initial investment cost. ROI and Return on Objectives are closely intertwined. Digital signs  utilized for wayfinding may not appear to lead directly to increased revenues. However, by freeing up staff time, previously spent providing directions, the staff are now available to perform revenue generating activities instead. Thus, the wayfinding system indirectly leads to increased revenues. When thinking about ROI it is also important to consider the timeframe. Generally, the ROI in technology needs to be looked at from a longer term point of view and a Total Cost of Ownership (TCO).  The cost of investing in a digital signage network in the near term might far outweigh the cost of printing posters or adding additional staff. However, with digital signage you now have the ability to update your screens with real-time information, the option to update a single screen in a certain location for a specific purpose, or the entire network instantly. Compare that to the cost of trying to do that with printed signs or people, ROI and TCO appear a lot more appealing and the processes become a lot more efficient.   3. KNOW What to Measure Another, more subjective form of ROI is measuring positive feedback from guests before and after installation of digital signage. This can help you determine the impact of the investment and if it is meeting your objectives. Even simply observing people can answer some questions: How long do customers spend in front of a digital sign? How many followed up by buying a sale item advertised on the sign?   4. look at Advanced Methods of Measurement If these simple ways to measure digital signage ROI aren't sufficient, technology allows you to establish more detailed measurements. For example, by integrating the Internet of Things and electronic sensors you can measure foot traffic or interactive touch screen responses. Another, more involved type of ROI measurement is conducting surveys or interviews and recording people's responses. Did they notice the digital signs? Did they find them helpful?   5. Measure It, and Manage It The old saying "You can't manage what you don't measure," while a cliché, is true. Fortunately, technology is making those measurements easier and more scientific, so businesses can track performance over both the short and long-term. Measuring ROI for digital signage makes sense, particularly for companies that plan to start small and roll out a larger digital signage project or network over time. Calculating ROI on initial projects can influence better ways to do things later on. Businesses in industries ranging from healthcare to manufacturing to hospitality and more have turned to digital signage solutions for informing employees, communicating important messages, enhancing safety and engaging customers. To make the most of your digital signage investment you need to calculate ROI. You will gain a deeper understanding of customer or employee behavior and can be fine-tune your digital signage strategy for maximum benefit.  

Are Your Communications on the Edge?

Edge computing is becoming more prevalent and with its growth comes impact. Various types of edge computing affect communications and their deployment. There are lots of factors involved in edge computing and to be able to optimize it in communications, you must understand how its deployed, used and what security concerns it may bring. Edge computing enables a real-time exchange on mobile and wireless platforms by taking the load off monolithic data processing centers and the cloud, shifting it to the devices that make up the Internet of Things (IoT). It makes processing data closer to where it was created possible. This can be within a device itself or close to the device. Different Types of Edge Computing There are four kinds of edge computing: mobile networks, enterprise, IoT, and device. Mobile Networks: For mobile communication providers, the edge remains on fixed and/or mobile network facilities, which translates to a number of possibilities such as decentralized core data centers, central offices, network aggregation points, eNodeB, or base stations. Enterprise: Enterprise edge describes compute workloads residing on an enterprise’s location to keep data and processing localized. This option may be in place to address latency or for compliance reasons. It could also be processed in combination with the telco network or centralized clouds. IoT: The IoT edge may be completed in an on-site gateway to reduce the amount of data sent to the centralized cloud or also for latency or compliance reasons. Device: The device edge is a large set and includes all IoT devices, surveillance cameras, autonomous cars, and smartphones. The Viability of Edge Computing Today Edge computing isn’t new, but several drivers are making it more viable today than ever before. The costs associated with it are decreasing. There is more computing power executed in smaller footprint devices. The amount of data is massive and will continue to grow. Finally, modern machine learning and analytics make it a very in-demand technology. Edge Computing for Communication Systems: Optimizing for High Performance We live in a data-heavy world, one that will only grow. With billions of devices connected to the internet, the expectation is for it to be fast and reliable. Fortunately, not all devices use cloud computing, which is where edge computing enters the picture. The communication layer of edge computing represents the medium of data transmission that should be secure from attacks. The communication layer has two parts: local communication and long-range communication. In a local communication scenario, the endpoint device talks to one or more edge gateways, allowing for entry to the enterprise network after authentication. Long-range communication works differently in that edge gateways communicate with one another or a centralized cloud platform through an orchestration layer. With long-range communication layers, cloud security is vital. Sensitive data should move from edge computing gateways to an encrypted cloud. There is a need for an edge orchestrator, which is a software layer for the management and configuration of edge devices. This allows for the movement of encrypted data from edge to master with ease. Digital certificates are also critical as they play a role in the authentication of cloud and third-party applications attempting to communicate with the cloud service. Orchestrating the cloud-based network and intelligent edges to benefit from low-latency and high-performance involves combining intelligent edge solutions and a centralized service control center. There you can realize compute power at the edge and a cloud-based, centralized platform to orchestrate it all. Edge Computing and Human-Centered Design: What is the Key to Proper Communication? With so many personal computing devices out there in the world, there are new challenges ahead. It’s been the catalyst for human-centered design, blurring the lines between man and machine. Edge computing is a new frontier in communication, creating an architecture of one or more collaborative multitudes of computing nodes, which are set between the sensor networks and cloud-based services. It enables a large amount of data to be processed, reducing retrieval time. It also allows for more control over the data. Edge Computing and Digital Communications In the world of digital communications, edge computing is changing how data is processed and analyzed. This is especially important when businesses depend on digital communications to drive action and decision-making. Edge computing delivers almost limitless applications—from integrating facial recognition to language processing. Edge computing and cloud computing are delivering a future full of possibilities for digital communications. But to get the most out of edge computing for communications systems, businesses must have a partner that understands the different forms of deployment, security considerations, and how to properly communicate as technologies and devices continue to evolve. By partnering with Omnivex, organizations can take advantage of this new technology now and stay in pace with advancements in communications delivery.

Generating a Tangible ROI with Digital Signage

Digital signage is found in nearly every corner of the modern world. Companies are discovering the benefits of strategic messaging that can be deployed easily across the globe. However, the question many newcomers are asking, though, is: “Will digital signage really generate a tangible Return on Investment (ROI)?” The simple answer is yes! Business goals and objectives The first step to generating positive ROI is understanding how your digital signage aligns with your business goals and objectives. What are you looking to achieve? Increased sales, reduced costs, enhanced customer experience, and brand awareness are just a few of the many positive benefits organizations derive from digital signage. Understanding your business goals and aligning that to your digital signage strategy will help create a positive digital blueprint. Make sure you have SMART (Specific Measurable Attainable Realistic Time-sensitive) goals. It is also important to consider how you will measure success. What constitutes enhanced customer experience? What costs are you looking to reduce and how will you measure their reduction? Tangible metrics If it exists you can usually find a way to measure it. Tangible digital signage metrics include increased sales, reduced costs, reduced wait times, and improved customer and employee satisfaction. One way that airports and other public facilities are currently deploying digital signage is as a wayfinding tool. The ROI on these types of deployments is evident in reduced wait times and employees having more time to help service other areas of the business. On the revenue side, the average increase in sales from digital signage is somewhere between 3-5%. There is an additional increase of margin per transaction of 2.5-3% based on customer upsells from attractive Point-of-Purchase (POP) displays. Surveys estimate that nearly 20% of customers have made an impulse purchase after seeing a product displayed on digital signage. This makes it is easy to see how quickly digital signage can provide a hard ROI, especially when displayed to large volumes of consumers. In another case study, a bank was able to reduce perceived wait time 10.8% through digital merchandising.[1] Product awareness doubled from 22% to 45% and customer recall for digital signage in branch reached nearly 63%. The positive impacts of a better customer experience and enhanced product recall are not always as easy to see as fluctuations in sales numbers. However, they are important barometers for the success of digital signage strategies. Measuring engagement It is also important to think outside the box about what is possible with digital signage. The rise of social media platforms gives businesses the opportunity to engage with their buyers in a completely novel way. For example, one way to increase engagement and ROI might be through a targeted Twitter campaign using specific hashtags. ROI is measured in growth of Twitter mentions and followers. The value of being a thought leader with millions of followers is potentially massive. Your customers are busy and distracted. The best way to bridge the gap between a prospect and a sale is through digital signage that connects and influences buying habits, all while improving interactions. ROI doesn’t need to be elusive. Whether your organization is seeking out revenue increases, better brand awareness, or improved customer experiences, digital signage can provide galvanizing opportunities.     [1] https://www.digitalistmag.com/industries/retail/2014/05/02/how-digital-signage-drives-marketing-roi-01249973

Striking a balance in a digital world

How a focus on digital innovation and operational excellence drives results Earlier this year, I had the great privilege of attending the CIO Perspectives conference. I participated in the Publisher’s Panel alongside executives from OpenText, ePlus and IDG Events. The topic of the day was business innovation and operational excellence. As part of the conversation, we addressed some key findings from the 2018 State of the CIO Report.  Of particular interest to me was the fact that while 88 per cent of CIOs say their role is becoming more focused on digital and innovation, nearly three quarters of respondents find it difficult to strike the balance between business innovation and operational excellence. This presents a significant challenge for CIOs and other leaders, as digital transformation is becoming increasingly crucial to businesses’ ability to thrive. However, operational excellence and business innovation are not either-or scenarios. In a recent blog post, I discussed the concept of digital maturity, which refers to a company’s ability to use new tools and strategies to adapt to an evolving digital environment. Ultimately, digital maturity and best-in-class operations go hand in hand. For a business to maintain operational excellence, it must embrace the digital landscape and use innovation to maximize its efficiency, gain a competitive advantage and increase its bottom line. It’s important to note that operational excellence, purpose-driven innovation and successful digital transformation are tied together by effective communication. Muddled messages and tired delivery methods limit the potential for a symbiotic relationship between innovation and business excellence. As well, they can also have a negative impact on employee engagement, productivity and company results. Effective communication starts from the top, and it is up to the entire C-suite (including CIOs) to develop a comprehensive leadership strategy. It is important to foster an environment in which the right information is shared with right people at the right time on the right device. Tools like digital signs help companies that want to communicate in a meaningful and relevant way. However, leaders must first ensure that effective communication is baked into the company’s overarching strategy and is utilized up, down and across the organization. Dovetailing from effective communication is company-wide buy-in. This is the most crucial piece of any organization’s digital transformation. CIOs and other leaders, must secure alignment from all levels in order for change to be successful. If employees do not buy what the C-suite is selling, the risk of failure is high. As a result, operational efficiency and productivity will likely suffer. In order to mitigate this risk and build a cohesive, engaged workforce, employees must understand what is happening and why. This means any effort to improve operational efficiency through digital channels must be strategic and purposeful. Furthermore, executives must determine the methods and tactics of change that will work for their organization. At the end of the day, leaders struggling to strike a balance don’t have to choose. You can have both digital innovation and operational excellence. With careful planning, effective communication and a clear, purpose-driven strategy, the two priorities can complement each other. This ensures the business remains productive and efficient today while prepar

Artifical Intelligence: The Future of Digital Communications

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is enabling organizations to create a more personalized digital communications experience. The AI market is predicted to rise to nearly $60 billion by 2025. AI Will Provide Tremendous Growth Opportunities AI permits machines to learn from data in much the same way as the brain does and then use that knowledge to perform human-like tasks. Artificial intelligence is used in some very exciting applications, including speech recognition, complex problem solving, and voice-enabled digital assistants. Communications and media companies have embraced AI. Accenture Strategy research found that 63 percent of telecommunications executives believe AI deployment will drive additional revenue and growth opportunities. That’s why 72 percent of these same executives identify AI as a Top Three business priority currently or within one year. It’s clear that AI is the future of digital communications. AI Allows Personalization and Segmentation on a Level Never Seen Before Customers expect a personalized experience with information that is relevant to them. AI helps deliver that experience by enabling organizations to draw on the vast amount of historical data they have have collected and leverage it to deliver the targeted content. For example, digital signage can detect that a shopper entering a store is a female with curly hair. Using AI the shopper is shown store items that customers like her have purchased. Artificial Intelligence can also predict other offer aspects, like the quoted price necessary to make a conversion or which clients are more prone to making more than one purchase. Machines have the power to process huge amounts of data, quickly decide which data is most relevant, and then segment appropriately. AI Will Transform Digital Communications AI solutions for digital communications are becoming even more customizable, allowing the optimization of digital advertising and algorithm-generated content. For example, AI can determine which ad to display by interpreting audience engagement levels and comparing them to historical behavior data. In fact, digital signage networks that use AI increase content relevancy by up to 50 percent. As these tools evolve they will reach a point where they are able to surpass human ability. Gartner predicts by 2020 85% of customer interactions will be managed by artificial intelligence. Artificial Intelligence can help improve the productivity, efficiency, and profitability of your digital communications.

Standalone Digital Communications Displays Are Dead

Standalone Digital Signage is Dead In the early days of digital signage, screens were often standalone displays that didn’t communicate with others. The technology had not matured enough to create a fully integrated system. This, coupled with high costs, kept digital displays standalone. However, much has changed since then. With the barriers of complex connections and high costs gone, digital communications can now leverage data to create relevant and personalized experiences. The standard is for all displays and content to live on one network. The days of the standalone displays are officially dead. In its place is the ability for any space to be connected digitally — from campuses to offices to hospitals to just about anywhere! Connected Networks Streamline Content Creation Before the connected era, standalone displays required every screen “owner” to create their own content. This was inefficient, time-consuming,  and the content often was inconsistent. It created communications silos, where each installation had no ability to talk to another or share content. A connected system changes all of that. With a network, you have the ability to create content on a standardized template and share it across all of your screens. For example, hospitals, which are often massive in size and have multiple buildings, can connect every display on one network. Each department or group at the facility may be responsible for their content, but the content is now cohesive and usable on any screen. Welcome screens may add some content from the food service screens announcing lunch specials. Or, the digital screens in the cafeteria, may run, with their menus, a reminder to complete a satisfaction survey or get a flu shot. Networking your digital signage improves branding, allows for messaging to be unified and creates opportunities for cross-promotion. It’s also a significant time saver, streamlining the process can equate to significant time and cost savings. IoT Devices’ Data Collection Influences Digital Communications A major part of any connected space today is IoT (Internet of Things) devices. These devices are capable of making things easier for those in the spaces. They can track and store data as well as communicate with digital displays. Consider a busy parking lot and real-time parking availability. Beacons fire off data identifying where parking is available and where it’s occupied. That data is then publishable via digital communications on screens at the entrance, through mobile apps or through colored lights over the spaces. From college campuses to airports to shopping centers, parking is frustrating and can take considerable time. With this data, drivers know more quickly where they kind find a parking spot. In terms of security and safety, sensor data could prompt real-time communications on every screen. Whether it is a fire alarm or other safety alarms triggered by disasters like tornadoes or hurricanes, a digital network can enable a quick systemwide message. If you’re struggling with a disconnected digital system, it’s time to move to the new standard. With Omnivex, our platform enables you to connect, distribute, present and automate messaging to any screen.    

Does Your Business Need the Internet of Things and Blockchain?

Experts expect global spending on information technology (IT) to reach an astounding $3.7 trillion in 2018. That’s 4.5 percent more than the spending in 2017, despite relative uncertainty in the market. Growth in several areas of IT will influence this spending, notably the Internet of Things (IoT) and blockchain. With IT developing so quickly, it’s increasingly important that business decision makers make informed choices on how to move forward. Many businesses today are prioritizing customer satisfaction and connectivity. To move a company in this direction, executives must decide if IoT and blockchain can help their business. What is the Internet of Things? The “Internet of Things” may sound like just a trendy buzzword, but it’s a phenomenon that affects most people in the developed world in 2018. In short, the Internet of Things is the connectivity in everyday devices. Our society has created the Internet of Things by making coffee pots, refrigerators, thermostats, light bulbs, cars and many other objects into data transmitters and receivers.  Kevin Ashton is the expert credited with coining the term. He said, "If we had computers that knew everything there was to know about things—using data they gathered without any help from us—we would be able to track and count everything, and greatly reduce waste, loss, and cost." What Will the Internet of Things Change? Many experts may answer this question with one word: everything. It’s true that the Internet of Things has the potential to impact most parts of daily life. However, the leading industries that this technology seeks to change right now are energy, healthcare, retail, logistics, and manufacturing. Whether it’s the step counter on your wrist or the quality-control device on your machinery, it will be nearly impossible to avoid the Internet of Things in coming years. Unlike other emerging technologies, such as augmented reality and artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things is not a disruptive innovation. Instead, it is an additive. Rather than demolishing existing businesses (like Uber did for taxis), the Internet of Things will drive savvy companies forward. How to Implement the Internet of Things The best ways to use the Internet of Things in any business will depend on the company’s needs, industry, and goals. Decision makers should consider where they can get the most value from the Internet of Things. For example, some businesses may want to use this technology to better understand its customers and their needs. Another company may understand their customers well enough but could use the Internet of Things to make daily operations more efficient. The chances are that if a business faces a fundamental problem, there is some way the Internet of Things can help.  What is Blockchain? The term “blockchain” is often used side-by-side with “bitcoin,” which means that sometimes people use these terms interchangeably. While they are interconnected, blockchain and bitcoin are separate terms. Before a professional can decide if blockchain is right for the business, it's essential to understand these two terms fully.  Bitcoin, in short, is a cyber-currency. Rather than spending a dollar or some other government-backed currency, bitcoin is entirely online. Blockchain is the type of technology that makes spending bitcoin possible. Blockchain technology creates a record that is not centralized, which is essential to bitcoin and what makes it different than sending a payment of currency over a system like PayPal. Furthermore, blockchain technology is as impossible to change as the serial number on a dollar bill. Is Blockchain Disruptive? Unlike the IoT, blockchain is an entirely disruptive innovation. In fact, turning the financial industry on its head is at the core of these technologies. In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, many people went in search of an alternative to traditional banking. The answer was bitcoin. Bitcoin would need specialized technology to make it work, and blockchain was born from that need. Do All Businesses Need Blockchain? While blockchain may not become as ubiquitous as the IoT (at least, not as quickly), there are plenty of business applications for this emerging technology. Blockchain technology could help a business when it’s time for an audit. It can also help create better contracts and make supply chains more transparent. Whether your business decides to implement both of these technologies, one, or neither, it is essential for decision makers to stay on top of trends in technology. Things can change quickly in IT, and you can get left behind if you move too slowly.

Does Your Business Need Virtual Reality and Artificial Intelligence?

If it feels like you hear something new about virtual reality (VR) or artificial intelligence (AI) every day, you’re not alone. Like other communications technology, these areas have grown at astonishing rates. In fact, the virtual and augmented reality market may be worth 215 billion U.S. dollars by 2021. Likewise, there have been 14 times more startups in the AI space than in 2000. As a business professional, all these new technologies can leave your head spinning. Each one promises to revolutionize your business, making it difficult to understand the real potential of each new technological release. Don’t let the speed and intensity of these industries turn you away from great communications technologies. Instead, take a moment to explore emerging VR, AR, and AI technologies to foster informed purchasing decisions. How do I decide which technologies to integrate? Right now, organizations are facing a massive wave of disruption. The technology on top right now could be gone as quickly as it came. While this tsunami of disruption is great for innovation, it can be dizzying for businesses. The best way to decide if a new technology is worth your investment is to consider if and how your employees or customers can use it. That may seem obvious, but it's not always simple to know exactly what you will use. Consider if the innovation adds real value or if it's just a shiny new object. Is it additive or disruptive? Virtual reality versus augmented reality Virtual Reality (VR) has gotten lots of media in recent years. The equipment creates an entirely immersive experience, which for some businesses is the whole appeal. For example, gaming companies are leveraging virtual reality to create a three dimensional environment that the player can interact with during the game. The high expense of VR may ultimately deter most organizations from using it and has definitely impacted it being widely adopted. Instead, its brother technology, Augmented Reality (AR), is better poised for widespread adoption and longevity. AR adds to the existing world rather than creating an immersive world. When we look at gaming again the widespread popularity of Pokemon Go illustrates how easy to use this technology is and how widespread its adoption can be. However AR isn’t just for gamers, there a multitude of business applications from wayfinding to digital signage to advertising. Experts expect augmented reality to grow faster than its fully immersive counterpart. In fact, some predict the AR market to increase from $2.35 billion in 2015 to $117 billion in 2022. Companies like Pepsi Max have used this technology effectively in their signage, and you can expect to see more AR in advertising soon.  What About Artificial Intelligence? If your mind automatically goes to the Terminator when you think of Artificial Intelligence (AI), think again. AI has been in homes and businesses across the globe for years. Every time someone asks their Amazon Echo a question, they utilize AI. In the business setting, AI has detected credit card fraud for years. However, while AI is an established part of our society, it is far from reaching its full potential. AI will allow businesses to collect more and better data. Perhaps that is why experts expect spending on artificial intelligence in retail to grow from $2 billion in 2018 to $7.3 in 2022. AI will also allow businesses to better understand their customers and offer better services. With many organizations focused on improving employee and customer experience, AI will become a valuable tool. The Bottom Line In this time of incredible change, it is essential to keep up with emerging technology. However, it's equally important not to get swept away in the wave of disruption and think about what is important to your business and what objectives you are trying to achieve.

AI is changing the face of retail

Digital signage is now a familiar site in the modern world. From displaying menus at restaurants to offering directions in a building, digital signage feeds audiences information in a dynamic way. But how much more valuable could this channel be? Can digital signage take on a role to personalize messages or respond to a situation in real-time? Yes, with help from artificial intelligence (AI) and deep learning. Deep learning turns data into action With deep learning, AI-driven platforms evaluate large data sets, typically in real-time, leading to specific reactions. AI engines have access to huge amounts of data. Data, of course, isn’t any good unless it’s analyzed and delivers an actionable response. AI is all about automation. It doesn’t necessarily “think” for you. What it can do is draw conclusions, find patterns, and react to situations. The platform can “learn” over time, making it an even more valuable tool. So, what does the future of digital signage look like with a boost from AI and deep learning? Personalized Experiences Every customer wants to feel important and have a personalized experience. AI and deep learning are the tools to make it happen. Soon, digital signage platforms, powered by AI and deep learning, could actually recognize customers. Just like local stores once new all their customers’ names, digital signage could act as a greeter. The digital signage could recognize the customer, say hello, and offer them useful information like what’s on sale, based on the customer’s buying history. While an amazing fete of technology, organizations should present this as a way to personalize what you see, becoming a benefit rather than a privacy concern. More Relevant Content In-store shopping continues to decline in favor of online shopping. That means retailers need to create experiences for shoppers who visit their brick-and-mortar stores. Many have already been using digital signage to promote sales or offer customers an in-depth look at products. AI can take it to the next level with personalization. A business already has historical data on its customers and their behaviors. Specific content is already created that plays at certain times or days. That’s the baseline that informs what content these consumers would most want to see. With AI and deep learning, there are two ways to improve content: either by putting the data in context or creating personalized ads. With context, the system is already starting with known behaviors like an increase in purchases of sunglasses after sunny days. But that won’t always be true. Deep learning adds context to this “rule” by capturing and integrating content that informs the situation. Maybe it’s a rainy day, which the system could detect with weather data. Or, the store knows, via sensors, that no one is shopping for sunglasses. This “learning” allows for the signage to “overrule” the sunglasses promo, switching it to items shoppers were currently looking at or umbrellas. Deep learning by an AI platform enables targeting down to the individual. If a male shopper enters a clothing store, digital signage could detect that the shopper was in his 20s wearing hiking boots. The system takes this information then reviews what items are in stock or on sale that men who purchased hiking boots also bought. What it finds could then be communicated to the shopper in almost real-time. Not only is the customer seeing personalized information it will prompt them to look at these items and make more purchases. How Will AI Evolve Your Digital Signage? The investment in digital signage and AI will continue to grow. The global digital signage market is expected to grow to $31.71 billion by 2025. While the AI market is predicted to rise to nearly $60 billion by 2025. These sectors are seeing phenomenal growth, which means organizations all over the world are investing in them to deliver better results. Intelligent digital communications are changing the world. Are you ready to be a part of it?  

Big data in digital communications

While data is at the heart of business and technology, many organizations are unable to leverage these silos of wealth and make them useful, due to challenges in consolidating and sharing the information. Unlocking the power of data is key to creating a competitive advantage. This infographic looks at the volume, velocity, variety, veracity, and value of the data in organizations today.

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