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DSE 2019: Transforming Customer Experiences with Innovation and Disruption

There is no better show to attend to check the pulse of the digital signage industry than the Digital Signage Expo––the world’s only international industry dedicated show. This immersive experience offers attendees a full-scale introduction to every aspect of digital and interactive signage. Transforming Every Experience This year’s theme at DSE is “Transform the _________ experience,” which includes traveler, customer, shopper, restaurant, guest, campus, healthcare, visitor and much more. Digital signage enables brands to create memorable experiences in just about any application you can imagine. There are really no limits to what can be done to transform a user’s experience. With over 4,000 users, system integrators, distributors, installers, and professionals, attendees will have the opportunity to better understand how their industry can use digital signage to communicate and connect with their audiences. Digital signage originated as a simple way to pass along information, often taking the place of static signage. Now, with the innovations of AI, social media, analytics, and mobile technology, digital signage is capable of doing much more. You’ll learn how these areas can merge with digital signage and more throughout the course of the week. Attendees will have the chance to attend 75 unique education sessions, workshops, and panel discussions. Design and Technology: Rethinking Digital Communications in the 21st Century For successful digital comm implementations, both design and technology are necessary. Each is equally important and will continue to be in the future. Digital signage, always a sector committed to innovation, is on the cusp of offering new opportunities to brands. Rethinking the way that digital signage creates experiences is in order. First, digital signage is becoming more affordable. Today, you can purchase a 4K LED TV for about the same price as a color acrylic print. Digital signage adoption, with screens that play animated content, have a much more powerful presence that a static sign, and now it’s no longer cost prohibitive for companies to be all in. Digital signage also doesn’t have to be in a box, literally. New sizes and shapes will soon be the norm allowing you to construct a display wall based on more complex designs. This flexibility is now possible because of new manufacturing processes that allow screens to be cut like paper for any size or shape. Couple this with short-throw laser projections, projection mapping techniques, and electronic ink, and you have the ability to create digital signage on any surface. This could transform signage in general from endcaps at retail stores to large-scale productions in a variety of spaces. Next, is the significant trend of interactivity. Screens can now respond to users and other screens. Voice, gestures, and facial expressions can all be “read” by digital signage, offering haptic communication in response. This technology will become more prevalent as a new way to tell a story—one that the user is a part of. Engaging Audiences with Customized Experiences Engaging audiences with any type of content isn’t easy but making it more dynamic and customized is a start. For a brand to be able to pull this off requires a lot of moving pieces. The message of the brand should remain clear and consistent as well as allow for self-updating content to be included. Your audience will also appreciate real-time, relevant local information, not just the time and weather. For example, Apple stores have a concept called “Today at Apple.” This content is meant to inform and interest viewers without being overly salesy. It gives the customer time to explore the environment and spend more time at the store. This helps creates an emotional connection to the brand and message. To do this right, as Apple has, you have to consider who your audience is and what matters to them in that moment. Digital Signage Disruption: VR and Visual Effects Virtual reality is primed to be a new disruptor to digital signage. There are many ways in which VR and digital signage can completely revolutionize certain situations. When paired with digital signage, it has the capacity to create some of the most immersive experiences ever. Digital signage is actually an extension of VR. Consider some of these possibilities. A real estate agent could take a buyer on a home tour without leaving the office. Museums can use them to create an experience that’s a real game changer, bringing art or displays to life and more accessible to visitors. In retail, using VR and digital signage could be the next step of letting buyers try before they buy. These are just a few examples of the opportunities for these two technologies to work together. Omnivex, a leading software provider for all aspects of digital communications, looks forward to exploring these exciting topics and more at this year’s DSE. We’ll be looking at all the latest trends and inspirations to transform customer experiences across industries. To learn more about digital signage and modern marketing, check out our eBook.

Future-proofing the retail experience

Founded in 1984, NU SKIN is a health and beauty company that develops and sells over 200 personal care products. Listed on the New York Stock Exchange, Nu Skin’s products are available in around 50 markets all over the world through a multi-level marketing business model, which is made up of independent business partners and distributors. Wanting to further adapt to market trends and appeal to a younger demographic, Nu Skin approached SLD to create a new experience center that could be utilized throughout their growing China market. SLD worked collaboratively with consulting firm, MetaThink, to build a new flagship store that is an immersive, engaging experience for all visitors. Nu Skin unveiled their new experience center, Nu Xtore, in Shenzhen, China in November 2018.  Leveraging the latest in technology and design trends, Nu Xtore creates a personalized, interactive experience through the integration of both digital and physical elements. The store features over 50 digital screens in a variety of configurations, powered by Omnivex Moxie software. On the SLD website you can read their full case study on Nu Skin to learn more about the project and how SLD helped create an experience center that reflected the company’s story and brand culture, and showcased products.

Omnivex Guide to Digital Signage & Modern Marketing

In today's technology driven world, digital marketing strategies are rapidly superseding traditional marketing methods. Digital signage is a leading tactic as it reaches 70% of the public each year. It’s flexible, allowing for updates and changes, collects data, customizable, and it’s everywhere. From retail stores to hospitals, airports to universities, digital signage is empowering audiences. To optimize implementation and messaging of digital signage, it is important to consider your strategy, content and design, platforms and networking. Learn more in our eBook - The Omnivex Guide to Digital Signage & Modern Marketing

Are Your Communications on the Edge?

Edge computing is becoming more prevalent and with its growth comes impact. Various types of edge computing affect communications and their deployment. There are lots of factors involved in edge computing and to be able to optimize it in communications, you must understand how its deployed, used and what security concerns it may bring. Edge computing enables a real-time exchange on mobile and wireless platforms by taking the load off monolithic data processing centers and the cloud, shifting it to the devices that make up the Internet of Things (IoT). It makes processing data closer to where it was created possible. This can be within a device itself or close to the device. Different Types of Edge Computing There are four kinds of edge computing: mobile networks, enterprise, IoT, and device. Mobile Networks: For mobile communication providers, the edge remains on fixed and/or mobile network facilities, which translates to a number of possibilities such as decentralized core data centers, central offices, network aggregation points, eNodeB, or base stations. Enterprise: Enterprise edge describes compute workloads residing on an enterprise’s location to keep data and processing localized. This option may be in place to address latency or for compliance reasons. It could also be processed in combination with the telco network or centralized clouds. IoT: The IoT edge may be completed in an on-site gateway to reduce the amount of data sent to the centralized cloud or also for latency or compliance reasons. Device: The device edge is a large set and includes all IoT devices, surveillance cameras, autonomous cars, and smartphones. The Viability of Edge Computing Today Edge computing isn’t new, but several drivers are making it more viable today than ever before. The costs associated with it are decreasing. There is more computing power executed in smaller footprint devices. The amount of data is massive and will continue to grow. Finally, modern machine learning and analytics make it a very in-demand technology. Edge Computing for Communication Systems: Optimizing for High Performance We live in a data-heavy world, one that will only grow. With billions of devices connected to the internet, the expectation is for it to be fast and reliable. Fortunately, not all devices use cloud computing, which is where edge computing enters the picture. The communication layer of edge computing represents the medium of data transmission that should be secure from attacks. The communication layer has two parts: local communication and long-range communication. In a local communication scenario, the endpoint device talks to one or more edge gateways, allowing for entry to the enterprise network after authentication. Long-range communication works differently in that edge gateways communicate with one another or a centralized cloud platform through an orchestration layer. With long-range communication layers, cloud security is vital. Sensitive data should move from edge computing gateways to an encrypted cloud. There is a need for an edge orchestrator, which is a software layer for the management and configuration of edge devices. This allows for the movement of encrypted data from edge to master with ease. Digital certificates are also critical as they play a role in the authentication of cloud and third-party applications attempting to communicate with the cloud service. Orchestrating the cloud-based network and intelligent edges to benefit from low-latency and high-performance involves combining intelligent edge solutions and a centralized service control center. There you can realize compute power at the edge and a cloud-based, centralized platform to orchestrate it all. Edge Computing and Human-Centered Design: What is the Key to Proper Communication? With so many personal computing devices out there in the world, there are new challenges ahead. It’s been the catalyst for human-centered design, blurring the lines between man and machine. Edge computing in a new frontier in communication, creating an architecture of one or more collaborative multitudes of computing nodes, which are set between the sensor networks and cloud-based services. This level enables a large amount of data to be processed, reducing retrieval time. It also allows for more control over the data. Edge Computing and Digital Communications In the world of digital communications, edge computing is changing how data is processed and analyzed. This is especially important when businesses depend on digital communications to drive action and decision-making. Edge computing delivers almost limitless applications—from integrating facial recognition to language processing. Edge computing and cloud computing are delivering a future full of possibilities for digital communications. But to get the most out of edge computing for communications systems, businesses must have a partner that understands the different forms of deployment, security considerations, and how to properly communicate as technologies and devices continue to evolve. By partnering with Omnivex, organizations can take advantage of this new technology now and stay in pace with advancements in communications delivery.

Generating a Tangible ROI with Digital Signage

Digital signage is now found in nearly every corner of the modern world, and a substantial swath of new companies are discovering the benefits of strategic messaging that can be deployed across the globe via the simple touch of a button. However, the question many newcomers are asking, though, is: “Will digital signage really generate a tangible Return on Investment (ROI)?” The simple answer is yes! Business goals and objectives The first step to generating positive ROI is understanding how your digital signage aligns with your business goals and objectives. What are you looking to achieve? Increased sales, reduced costs, enhanced customer experience, and brand awareness are just a few of the many positive benefits organizations derive from digital signage. Understanding your business goals and aligning that to your digital signage strategy will help create a positive digital blueprint for your organization. Make sure you have SMART (Specific Measurable Attainable Realistic Time-sensitive) goals. It is also important to consider how you will measure success. What constitutes enhanced customer experience? What costs are you looking to reduce and how will you measure their reduction? Tangible metrics If it exists you can usually find a way to measure it. Tangible metrics that are often measured in relation to digital signage include increased sales, reduced costs, reduced wait times, and improved customer and employee satisfaction. One way that airports and other public facilities are currently deploying digital signage is as a wayfinding tool. The ROI on these types of deployments is evident in reduced wait times and employees having more time to help service other areas of the business. On the revenue side, the average increase in sales from digital signage is somewhere between 3-5%. There is also an additional increase of margin per transaction of 2.5-3% based on customer upsells from attractive Point-of-Purchase (POP) displays. Surveys estimate that nearly 20% of customers have made an impulse purchase after seeing a product displayed on digital signage, making it is easy to see how quickly digital signage can provide a hard ROI, especially when displayed to large volumes of consumers. In another case study, a bank was able to reduce perceived wait time 10.8% through digital merchandising.[1] Product awareness doubled from 22% to 45% and customer recall for digital signage in branch reached nearly 63%. The positive impacts of a better customer experience and enhanced product recall are not always as easy to see as fluctuations in sales numbers, but they are never-the-less important barometers for the success of digital signage strategies. Measuring engagement It is also important to think outside the box about what is possible with digital signage. The rise of social media platforms and related applications gives businesses completely new, and often untapped, opportunities to engage with their buyers in a completely novel way. For example, one way to increase engagement and ROI might be through a targeted Twitter campaign that uses specific hashtags and measures growth in Twitter mentions and followers. The value of being a thought leader with millions of followers is potentially massive. Your customers are busy. Your customers are distracted. The best way to bridge the gap between a prospect and a sale is through digital signage that connects and influences buying habits, all while improving interactions. ROI doesn’t need to be elusive. Whether your organization is seeking out revenue increases, better brand awareness, or improved customer experiences, digital signage can provide galvanizing opportunities.       [1] https://www.digitalistmag.com/industries/retail/2014/05/02/how-digital-signage-drives-marketing-roi-01249973

Cybersecurity is a Challenge That Must Be Addressed

Technology continues to change, but now more rapidly than ever. As companies adopt new digital technologies––Internet of Things (IoT), big data, blockchain, cloud computing, and mobile computing––security must be a primary consideration. In the past, securing network perimeters from threats was enough. Now, data spreads across systems, devices, and the cloud, all of which require a comprehensive cybersecurity strategy. The Digital World Needs Security Just Like the Non-Digital World From decision making to customer service, digital technology continues to reinvent the way companies operate. The automation of business processes and increasing digital connectedness of technology have significantly raised cybersecurity risks and threat levels. Any vulnerabilities can be exploited to quickly proliferate a cyberattack throughout the entire supply chain, costing an organization not only money but also the trust of its customers. To properly address these concerns, it is essential to take a proactive approach and build security directly into storage, applications, and interconnected devices. This ensures organizations can maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data wherever it resides, whether on premises, in the cloud, or in hybrid environments. IoT is Reinventing How Companies Conduct Business The Internet of Things makes cybersecurity essential, but also more challenging. Through IoT, billions of devices are now connected and interacting to a degree that the world has not seen before. As IoT becomes more prevalent, malicious cyberattacks are growing in frequency and sophistication. With these devices being deployed in potentially vulnerable environments, such as vehicles, banks, hospitals, factories, and power grids, the risks to human welfare grows more serious. The message is clear. Failing to secure these devices could have devastating real-world consequences. In Connected Environments, Security Must Exist Across All Applications IT personnel regularly secure outside access to their networks and applications. However, the transformation of digital communication has created a vast network of interconnected environments, so perimeter protection is no longer adequate. Once a cyber-attacker compromises a weak link, they have access to the company’s networks, systems, and data. In a digital world, security must be proactively embedded into all applications as the first line of defense. In addition, security controls should be defaulted to the highest levels of protection. Encryption of data in transit and two-factor authentication are additional measures that can dramatically increase the security of communications. It is essential that the cybersecurity and IT professionals find a common understanding, a shared terminology, and a unified approach to securing applications and data.  

Digital Technologies and Priorities in 2019

Digital transformation was a hot topic in 2018 and it is sure to continue impacting organizations in 2019. In fact, according to a Forrester Research survey, 46% of executives believe that in less than five years, digital will have an impact on more than half their sales. The World Economic Forum estimated that digital transformation has the potential to create as much as $100 trillion in combined value for both industry and society by 2025. There are several trends within digital transformation worth further investigation: Digital Transformation Continues as a Top Priority for Business Leaders A recent Randstad study found that 95% of the 3,000 surveyed organizations felt a new type of leadership is required to adequately address changes in organizational structures and operating models due to digitalization. Rapid technological advances are causing companies to view this as an overall business priority, not just a technology or IT goal. To address this issue, an estimated 60% of CIOs are growing their budgets for analytics, machine learning, and data science according to Forbes. AI Will Power More Tools from Search to Digital Communications Consumers have embraced artificial intelligence through the use of virtual assistants like Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa, and other devices. But with the rapid advancements of IoT devices and AI chips, artificial intelligence will be used for a lot more than finding a song or predicting the weather. Chatbots such as Mya will help HR pre-qualify candidates for jobs and even automatically reject a candidate if you decide to pass on his or her application. In addition, these chatbots will allow companies to use virtual agents to solve customer service issues without having to pass off calls to a human. Potential Blockchain Applications will Continue to Grow Most of us think of blockchain as a way to create digital currency such as Bitcoin, but this only scratches the surface of its capabilities. Blockchain-inspired solutions can also be used to achieve operational efficiency by automating business processes or digitizing records. The applications that will be produced with blockchain technology in the near future have the potential to enhance the secure sharing of information among known entities, as well as improving opportunities for tracking and tracing physical and digital assets. The Connected Cloud Will Produce a Mix of Different Cloud-Based Technologies Connected clouds are evolving to meet the varying needs of companies, whether they want cloud-source storage, networking, security, or app deployment. Public cloud providers like Amazon and Alibaba, for example, are now offering private cloud options as well. Providers are showing an increased commitment to connecting clouds so applications run seamlessly, secure, and streamlined. Finding the right mix of workloads running in public, private, and hybrid environments will be a big topic in 2019. Smart Spaces from Hospitals to Offices to Transportation and Manufacturing Centers A smart space is a physical or digital environment in which multiple elements––including people, processes, services, and things––interact to create a more immersive, interactive and automated experience for a target set of people and industry scenarios. This can be seen in the advent of smart cities, digital workplaces, smart homes, and connected factories. The creation of smart spaces is poised to accelerate rapidly and become an integral part of the daily life of employees, customers, consumers, community members, and citizens. Digital Ethics and Privacy: The Value of Information Individuals, organizations, and governments are growing concerned about the use of their personal information by organizations in both the public and the private sector. Organizations must proactively address these concerns or face the inevitable backlash. This requires taking more action than just ensuring an organization is compliant with privacy laws. Digital ethics will be a hot topic as organizations learn to ways to handle privacy and information in 2019. Increased Use of Data and Analytics Across All Parts of Organizations Augmented analytics use machine learning to transform how data is developed, consumed, and shared. Automated insights from augmented analytics will be embedded in enterprise applications, such as those used by HR, finance, sales, marketing, customer service, and procurement, to optimize the decisions and actions of all employees and automate the process of data preparation, insight generation, and insight visualization. In many situations, this will eliminate the need for professional data scientists.

Striking a balance in a digital world

How a focus on innovation and operational excellence drive business results Earlier this year, I had the great privilege of attending the CIO Perspectives conference and participate in the Publisher’s Panel alongside executives from OpenText, ePlus and IDG Events. The topic of the day was business innovation and operational excellence, and as part of the conversation, we addressed some key findings from the 2018 State of the CIO Report.  Of particular interest to me was the fact that while 88 per cent of CIOs say their role is becoming more focused on digital and innovation, nearly three quarters of respondents find it difficult to strike the balance between business innovation and operational excellence. Taken at face value, this presents a significant challenge for CIOs and other leaders, as digital transformation is becoming increasingly crucial to businesses’ ability to thrive. However, operational excellence and business innovation are not either-or scenarios. In a recent blog post, I discussed the concept of digital maturity, which refers to a company’s ability to use new tools and strategies to adapt to a digital environment that is constantly evolving. Ultimately, digital maturity and best-in-class operations go hand in hand: for a business to maintain operational excellence, it must embrace the digital landscape and use innovation to maximize its efficiency, gain a competitive advantage and increase its bottom line. At Omnivex, we offer a free Digital Assessment Tool, which allows companies to assess their digital maturity and use the findings to inform their digital transformation strategies. It’s important to note that operational excellence, purpose-driven innovation and successful digital transformation are tied together by effective communication. Muddled messages and tired delivery methods not only limit the potential for a symbiotic relationship between digital innovation and business excellence, but they can also have a negative impact on employee engagement, productivity and company results. What’s more, effective communication starts from the top, and it is up to the entire C-suite (including CIOs) to develop a comprehensive leadership strategy that fosters an environment in which the right information is shared with right people at the right time on the right device. Tools like digital signs are a benefit to companies that want to communicate in a meaningful and relevant way, but on a higher level, leaders must first ensure that effective communication is baked into the company’s overarching strategy and is utilized up, down and across the organization. Dovetailing from effective communication is company-wide buy-in, which is the most crucial piece of any organization’s digital transformation. CIOs, in collaboration with other leaders, must secure alignment and engagement from all levels and departments in order for change to be successful. If employees do not buy what the C-suite is selling, the risk of failure is high and, as a result, operational efficiency and productivity will likely suffer. In order to mitigate this risk and build a cohesive, engaged workforce, employees must understand what is happening and why, meaning that any effort to improve operational efficiency through digital channels must be strategic and purposeful. Furthermore, executives must determine the methods and tactics of change that will work for their organization’s specific needs, goals and culture. At the end of the day, leaders struggling to strike a balance don’t have to choose: they can have both digital innovation and operational excellence. With careful planning, effective communication and a clear, purpose-driven strategy, the two priorities can complement each other to ensure the business remains productive and efficient today while preparing for the new, always-changing realities of tomorrow.

What Does the Future of Information & IT Look Like in 2019?

Since the late 90s, when internet adoption became mainstream, there have been extensive predictions for the future of information and IT. While many seemed fantastical, space-aged imaginings of a technological culture gone too far, countless of these insights have indeed materialized, providing for a complex, yet connected world most could never have imagined. So, what does the future of information look like in 2019? Early Assumptions In a 2003 Harvard Business Review article, author Nicholas G. Carr asserted that IT had become ubiquitous and commoditized.1 In his view, IT was merely a standard cost of doing business that offered no competitive advantage. In the years to follow, cloud computing deconstructed the traditional IT organization and businesses have flocked to inexpensive or free applications as the cornerstone of their operations. With competitors mainly utilizing the same tools, the competitive advantage has shifted to other technologies. Microsoft’s Vision from 2009 Known for setting industry trends, Microsoft is often looked to when it comes to the future outlook of information and IT. In 2009, a short video called, “Microsoft Office Labs Vision 2019” was released to the public.2 The video displays a futuristic world of technology that, at the time, may have seemed improbable. Featuring innovations like touchscreen windows and a digital interactive newspaper, the video piqued the imagination and instilled within us a future of possibilities yet to come. While it’s true that a few of these technological predictions haven’t made it to the consumer level yet, today, many seem less far-fetched than they did when Microsoft recorded the video a decade ago. Accenture’s Vision from 2011 In 2011, Accenture distributed its vision of future tech, predicting technology to become fully incorporated with business trends and societal movements.3 Accenture maintained that the path of IT carries as much importance for businesses and governments as it does for technology sector. They also took note of strides in data analytics for business integration, cloud computing, a shift to service-centric architecture, social networks driving business intelligence, and a transformation in data privacy risk interpretation.  Accenture also noted that IT was no longer a supporting function, but rather a leading player in the lives of individuals.  While the report is a more matter-of-fact approach to the future of information and IT than Microsoft’s video, their intent to prophesize the direction of technology is similar. Much like Microsoft’s predictions, some of Accenture’s views have come to fruition or are still an anticipated possibility, while others have fallen short of the actual trajectory technological innovation has taken. Today’s Prediction for the Future of IT The vast array of emerging technologies today offers an even broader spectrum of possible expectations for the direction of information and IT. From automation and artificial intelligence to the internet of things4, modern technology solutions have the potential to impact every aspect of our lives and forever shape the path of society and technology. They represent significant gains in efficiency and productivity by empowering machines, and even networks of machines, to interact intelligently, learn, and improve on their own. Further, various new currencies are gaining a foothold in the economic world (i.e., cryptocurrency and blockchain technology), and their growing popularity could have a lasting impact on financial systems globally. Blockchain technology integrated into cryptocurrency promises to deliver added benefits in numerous industries as well. Regardless of what the future of information and IT holds, Omnivex is committed to staying current with both existing and emerging technologies, creating cutting-edge software to deliver complete digital communication network management solutions. Simply put, Omnivex enables organizations to improve the collection, distribution, and presentation of critical business information, ensuring our customers success.   1https://hbr.org/2003/05/it-doesnt-matter 2https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwj2s_5e12U 3https://insuranceblog.accenture.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Accenture_Technology_Vision_2011.pdf 4https://www.business2community.com/tech-gadgets/5-future-technologies-will-mainstream-2020-02006302  

The Importance of Digital Communications for IT

Information technology is defined as the utilization of computers to store, retrieve, and send data–while communication technology is the use of devices, such as telephones, radios, and computers, to facilitate communication between people. As technologies have continued to improve and expand functionalities, the realms of information technology and communication technology have become increasingly intertwined.  This trending convergence of information and communication technology offers tremendous opportunities for businesses, but it also creates challenges that must be met in order to realize its full potential. Because of this, the importance of digital communications as a priority for IT departments has never been higher. Digital Communications in the Workplace Access to digital communication tools in the workplace is now essential to building a cohesive and productive team. Developing relationships, sharing information, and engaging stakeholders anywhere on the planet are keys to a successful and growing business. Not only is digital communication good for business, but it’s also the way employees expect to communicate. “Digital communication in our personal lives has far outpaced the way we communicate in the workplace–so workers are now demanding better communication tools. To expect people to work any other way is a massively missed opportunity,” said Taylor Wallace, co-founder of WeVue. The benefits of digital communication are quite attractive, but there are challenges as well.  Implementing digital communication tools across a multigenerational workforce is not straightforward. People have different workplace perceptions, routines, and expectations.  Introducing new technology and ways of working can disrupt this cadence as employees adjust to the new working environment. Another potential issue is the overuse of digital communication. In some instances, workers spend more time communicating and less time working, resulting in lower productivity. A proper implementation strategy and clear communication expectations can help alleviate these concerns. Using Digital Communication Effectively Simply implementing new digital communication tools will not improve business performance. Carefully selecting the tool best suited for the business needs and developing an integration plan is absolutely essential. Implementing digital communication tools without a well thought out implementation and engagement plan will not solve organizational challenges. It is important to consider: who will be using the tools what will the tools be used for where are people using the tools located – office or remote why will they want to use the tools over traditional methods More than just office communications, consumers are increasingly making connections with businesses via digital communication. In fact, a survey by STARTEK found that 80% of consumers utilize a digital device to contact a company, while just 10% only use a phone. Even so, to be successful with digital communication, a solution must be carefully chosen and rolled out effectively. IT Must Lead the Way When it comes to selecting, implementing, and maintaining digital communication solutions, IT must lead the way and Omnivex is here to help. With powerful digital communication platforms that facilitate the collection, distribution, and presentation of targeted real-time information, Omnivex transforms the way organizations interact with their audiences.

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